CUSTOM OLDS TRUMPET CODES

Olds Custom trumpets were constructed using different permutations of bells and leadpipes. Some of these were original designs by Kanstul and Olson, and others were copies of other trumpets.

BELL CODES

The first two digits of the code refer to the source. A code beginning with "11", as an example, would be a copy of a French Meha Besson. The third digit refers to the accuracy of reproduction of the original. The digit "1" referred to a "direct copy", and the digit "2" referred to a "corrected copy". As explanation. Manufacturers typically measure other instruments thought to possess outstanding performance characteristics in an effort toward duplication. This measurement process does not, however, always represent a high degree of precision, usually as a function of the process involved.

The measurement process at Olds during the decades of approximately the 1960s and 1970s, involved the use of a set of disks, graduated in .002" increments, which were inserted into a tapered section of the trumpet, with the degree of insertion providing the precise cross-section at a given depth. From repeated measurements, a graphic representation of the cross section could be derived.

Drawing a graph would disclose the smoothness, or variability of, the tapered section. Anomalous sections in a curve could be ascribed to an error in measurement, an imperfection in the part such as a dent, or, in very rare situations, a purposeful modification from an expected curve.

Multiple measurements, often taken by different technicians, would resolve the possibility of measurement error. If different personnel arrived at essentially the same measurements, a discontinuous portion of a curve could be attributed to an imperfection in the part being measured, or a purposeful design intent.

After multiple trials, the resultant curve may have been duplicated accurately, and designated as a "direct copy", and the numeral "1".

If, however, the designers attributed a discontinuity to a post-manufacture imperfection such as a dent or patch, the curve would be modified to represent what was felt to have been the original designers intent. This "corrected copy" would be assigned the numeral "2" in the code.

Some models of the Custom trumpet bore the initials "K" and "O", referring to the designers, Zigmant Kanstul and R. Dale Olson.

In summary, the first digit of the Custom Trumpet code referred to the source instrument (i.e., Besson, Calicchio, Bach, etc), the second, the specific model of that source instrument (i.e. Brevete, Meha, etc.) The third digit referred to the accuracy with which the original design was replicated. The The fourth and fifth digits referred to the thickness of the bell (i.e., "16" would refer to a bell constructed of .016" thick material.

BELLS

(First Digit in Code)

1. French Besson
2. Calicchio
3. Olds
4. Bach
5. Mahillon

(Second Digit in Code)

BESSON

1. Brevete
2. Meha
3. Fabrication
4. English

CALICCHIO

1. Standard Bb

OLDS

1. Ambassador
2. Special
3. Super
4. Studio
5. Opera
6. Recording
7. Mendez

(Third Digit in Code)

1. Direct Copy of Original
2. Corrected Copy (Minor modifications)

O...K Original Design (O = Olson: K = Kanstul)

(Fourth and Fifth Digits in Code)

14 .014" thickness bell
16 .016" thickness bell
18 .018" thickness bell
20 .020" bell
Etc.

LEADPIPES

(First Digit in Code)

1. Besson
2. Calicchio
3. Olds
4. Bach
5. Mahillon

(Second Digit in Code)

BESSON

1. Brevete
2. Meha
3. Fabrication
4. English

OLDS

1. Ambassador
2. Special
3. Super
4. Studio
5. Opera
6. Recording
7. Mendez

(Third Digit in Code)

1. Direct Copy
2. Corrected Copy

O...K Original Design (O = Olson: K = Kanstul)

(Fourth Digit in Code)

1. Standard Weight
2. Light Weight

(Fifth Digit in Code)

1. Cut on Mark
2. Cut 1/4" Short
3. Cut 1/4" Long

(Sixth Digit in Code)

No sixth digit indicates a space of 1/4" from leadpipe to mouthpiece gap
1. No space
2. 1/8" Space

LEADPIPE CODES

The first, second, and third digits of a leadpipe code referred to the same references as the bells. The fourth digit referred to "1" (standard weight) or "2" (light weight). The fifth digit referred to the cut-off of the leadpipe along its taper. A sixth digit (if one exists) designated the length of the gap between the leadpipe and mouthpiece. If no sixth digit appeared, the gap was 1/4".

(Fourth digit in code)

1. Standard weight
2. Light weight

(Fifth Digit in Code)

1. Cut on mark
2. Cut 1/4" shorter
3. Cut 1/4" longer

(Sixth digit in code)

No sixth digit indicates a space of 1/4" between the leadpipe and mouthpiece.

1. No space between leadpipe and mouthpiece
2. 1/8" space between leadpipe and mouthpiece


|Back to Olds Central.

All images and text, ©2009 **** *****.   All rights reserved.